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Kingfish, Mackerel

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A variety of the mackerel fish family, which are members of the tuna family, that is most often found in warmer ocean waters, such as from the Carolina coast in the U.S. to Brazil in South America. This fish is favored as a gamefish, because of its fight and size that may range up to 100 pounds. Similar to other species of Mackerel, this fish has an oily, soft, pale flesh, that is sometimes pink, which when cooked, becomes flaky and firm with an off-white color. The rich flavor will vary according to the oiliness of the fish, which changes with the seasons and with different species, but the flavor is often compared to the Atlantic mackerel. Steaks or fillets of mackerel are available fresh or frozen and can be substituted with tuna, marlin, or swordfish in many cases. To check the fish for doneness, use the tip of a sharp knife and cut through the thickest part of the fillet. If the fish has been properly cooked, the meat will appear opaque but will still be moist. This species may also be referred to as king mackerels or kings. This type of mackerel is often confused with another species named Kingfish, which is a member of the drum family of fish. There is a southern kingfish and a northern kingfish, both drum species, which are not related to the tuna or mackerel family.

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